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Is karma really a b%&*h

Is karma really a b%&*h

Few days ago I stumbled upon one video on Facebook which was supposed to explain what is karma, and how does it really work. In short, video was showing the story of one man being unhappy in his marriage. He claimed to have found “simply better” woman for himself, and he didn’t care about feelings of his wife, neither his responsibilities he had as a husband.

He left his wife and started to live with a new girlfriend, who was divorced for several years at this point. Then, after three years, his new girlfriend realised that their relationship was very hard to maintain, they had difficulties, and she decided to get back to her ex-husband – because it was “simply easier”. The man was crushed and didn’t understand how the woman could care only about her feelings and how she forgotten about her responsibilities in the relationship.

Moral of the story was – what you do to others, others will do to you. Not saying that this is wrong assumption, but is karma really that simple?

Good karma VS bad karma
New age philosophies tend to look at karma in terms of being good or bad. You briefly look at the life of person and evaluate if person has good or bad karma. If person has lot of money, is liked by everyone and ideally doesn’t have to work much – it must be good karma, right? On the other hand, if person must work hard since young age, has lost a parent and is liked by just a few – must be bad karma, right?

Well, I personally know two people with exactly the same description. One has “good karma” and one has “bad karma”. Funny thing is that they know each other also – and “good karma” person claims that the “bad karma” person has “good karma” and vice versa.

“Good karma” person doesn’t need to struggle much in life, but when the small challenge in life comes, she is lost. On the other hand, because “bad karma” person needed to struggle a lot in young age, she is now confident and strong whenever any obstacle comes.

Even though “good karma” person is liked by everyone, she is not able to find a partner for herself, because everybody she meets wants to abuse her. On the other hand, because “bad karma” person is liked only by the few – those who like her, like her as she is. And she was able to found a partner with whom she is happy.

So what is good karma or what is bad karma? Does it depend on outer appearance, or does it work on some deeper level – our expectations, lessons and spiritual growth? Is it subjective or objective?

Story about the horse
There was once a father who lived with his son in small village. They had a horse, and were considered to be wealthy and lucky people. People were saying, “ah, they have good karma, it is easy for them”.

After some time horse ran away. This created very difficult situation for father and the son, as the horse was important for their income due to trade business. People in the village started to talk about father and son having very bad karma, as they were left without a horse.

Then one day son went to look for the horse and he found ten other horses on the way and he brought them all back to the village. He felt very happy and started to take good care of them. People in the village started to say how good karma son must have. He found ten horses!

As he was taking intense care of the horses, he had accident and broke his leg. In that moment people in the village started to gossip that son must have some bad karma because he broke his leg.

Shortly after that, war began in the the country, and authorities were sending all young people to fight. Of course, son could not go as he had broken his leg. Again, whole village started to talk how son must have good karma because he doesn’t need to go to war.

Their life goes on and karma keeps “changing” from good to bad…

Karma in ancient times
If we dive deep in ancient Vedic texts, we will see that Varuna – God of oceans, was associated with karma, as the one who brings our karma to life.

In early Vedic texts he was described as “lord of omniscience”, “giver of knowledge”, “life of our breath”. He was worshipped as brilliant and generous lord of creation, lord of universal eye and guide of humanity. He was given almost the highest position in Vedic pantheon.

“Varuna, dearest lord of our choice, we pray, loosen the highest, middling and the lowest bonds of our sin and slavery so that, O Lord Supreme of light, free from sin and slavery and living within the rules of your law, we may be fit for the attainment of the ultimate freedom of Moksha.

And may He, Aditya, imperishable lord of light and omniscience, sun and life’s energy, lord of noble and watchful action, keep us on the right path all days and nights and thus bless us across a full life of total fulfilment.”

– Rig Veda

However, in more recent Vedic texts, Puranas, he was portrayed as fat, bald, ugly looking cruel man with yellow or brownish red eyes, protruding teeth and wielding a noose. From a benevolent and graceful god, he was turned into a spiteful, malevolent and stern judge cum punisher. (Source: Varuna and his decline)

In ancient times people were living under certain conducts of non-violence, compassion and respect for all living beings. To uphold the dharma (righteousness) was their goal of life. Moksha (liberation) was their goal of life.

If we look at values which are dominant in our current world, we can see that situation has changed drastically.

Now, the question to be asked is – has Varuna changed, or did we change? Is karma really a b&%^h, or did we become a b&%^h, going against the universal law that keeps everything in balance?

Complexity of karma
Two years ago, when Guruji was in Croatia, I had the opportunity to witness his talk about karma. He gave us two “simple” examples of how karma works, which totally changed my perception and (mis)understanding of karma.

First one was a story of Adolf Hitler. We all know the story of what happened and what he did. We have understanding of his actions from earthly perceptive. However, Guruji said that from higher perspective situation looks much different. He said that in reality Hitler was very powerful and advanced soul, which was ready to degrade itself and take enormous amount of bad karma on itself, so God could manifest karma of millions of people through him. Millions of people who created bad karma in their previous lives got born around Hitler so God could balance their karma by being killed in their current life. All for the purpose of their souls burning karma faster and advancing on spiritual path.

Second was an example of disabled children, more specifically with Down syndrome. When we see those children, we feel sorry for them. Compassion starts awakening in our hearts. Guruji said that these are not stupid or defected souls. He said that these are, again, highly developed souls that were ready to take disability on them in order to awake compassion and love in people’s hearts. That is the purpose of their life. That is their karma.

Understanding karma
Guruji concluded his talk by saying that karma is so complex that human mind can’t understand it.

If we don’t have unlimited access to the past or the future, how can we even begin to think that we can understand karma? Karma is a system, which works flawlessly for infinite number of souls, some of which may not be even born yet, or the ones who took millions of lives already. How can human mind understand chain of actions and reactions, cause and effect, which may be millions of years old, or extends millions of years into the future?

In simple terms we can say – what you do to others, others will do to you. But is that all that karma is? Does karma have any other “intention” except punishing us or rewarding us? Is it maybe trying to teach us something on the way, too, so we can “come back on the right track”?

I will let you answer this question for yourself.

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